Unorfodocs

The crescent and the star
The seven inner R's
Sciences and all
Vibrant in the dark
At the speed of thought, wow
The mind's so powerful
It ain't long for your dreams it's surrounding you
Caution Caution, Careful Careful
A whole lotta fun but it ain't that simple...
The mathmatic, Asiatic, black magic, rap captains stay active free captives
nigga what's happenin?
Listen, life is fantastic
Beautiful and tragic
Plain, classic

Derek Jeter's Retirement Mobilizes a Celebrity Lineup of Hat-tippers - Video - Creativity Online

marieconfortosilvio:

Jordan’s brilliant hat tipping as for Derek Jeter.

#hattipped #Re2pect #greattribute #baseball

primaivy:

Francis Underwood’s cuff links from House of Cards

Double entendre#E. Meetchum👏😂

primaivy:

Francis Underwood’s cuff links from House of Cards

Double entendre#E. Meetchum👏😂

masterandthehound:

The Sartorialist: Lunch for 25, Edition III (by garancedore)

#thumbsup

thepeoplesrecord:

The troubling viral trend of the “hilarious” Black poor person
May 7, 2013

Charles Ramsey, the man who helped rescue three Cleveland women presumed dead after going missing a decade ago, has become an instant Internet meme. It’s hardly surprising—the interviews he gave yesterday provide plenty of fodder for a viral video, including memorable soundbites (“I was eatin’ my McDonald’s”) and lots of enthusiastic gestures. But as Miles Klee and Connor Simpson have noted, Ramsey’s heroism is quickly being overshadowed by the public’s desire to laugh at and autotune his story, and that’s a shame. Ramsey has become the latest in a fairly recent trend of “hilarious” black neighbors, unwitting Internet celebrities whose appeal seems rooted in a “colorful” style that is always immediately recognizable as poor or working-class.

Before Ramsey, there was Antoine Dodson, who saved his younger sister from an intruder, only to wind up famous for his flamboyant recounting of the story to a reporter. Since Dodson’s rise to fame, there have been others: Sweet Brown, a woman who barely escaped her apartment complex during a fire last year, and Michelle Clarke, who couldn’t fathom the hailstorm that rained down in her hometown of Houston, and in turn became “the next Sweet Brown.”

Granted, the buzzworthy tactic of reporters interviewing the most loquacious witnesses to a crime or other event is nothing new, and YouTube has countless examples of people of all ethnicities saying ridiculous things. One woman, for instance, saw fit to casually mention her breasts while discussing a local accident, while another man described a car crash with theatrical flair. Earlier this year, a “hatchet-wielding hitchhiker” named Kai matched Dodson’s fame with his astonishing account of rescuing a woman from a racist attacker. But none of those people have been subjected to quite the same level of derisive memeification as Brown, Clark, and now, perhaps, Ramsey—the inescapable echoes of “Hide yo’ kids, hide yo’ wife!” and “Kabooyaw,” the tens of millions of YouTube hits and cameos in other viral videos, even commercials.

It’s difficult to watch these videos and not sense that their popularity has something to do with a persistent, if unconscious, desire to see black people perform. Even before the genuinely heroic Ramsey came along, some viewers had expressed concern that the laughter directed at people like Sweet Brown plays into the most basic stereotyping of blacks as simple-minded ramblers living in the “ghetto,” socially out of step with the rest of educated America. Black or white, seeing Clark and Dodson merely as funny instances of random poor people talking nonsense is disrespectful at best. And shushing away the question of race seems like wishful thinking.

Ramsey is particularly striking in this regard, since, for a moment at least, he put the issue of race front and center himself. Describing the rescue of Amanda Berry and her fellow captives, he says, “I knew something was wrong when a little pretty white girl ran into a black man’s arms. Something is wrong here. Dead giveaway!”

The candid statement seems to catch the reporter off guard; he ends the interview shortly afterward. And it’s notable that among the many memorable things Ramsey said on camera, this one has gotten less meme-attention than most. Those who are simply having fun with the footage of Ramsey might pause for a second to actually listen to the man. He clearly knows a thing or two about the way racism prevents us from seeing each other as people.

Source

Now that you know this is a thing, please stop sharing these memes. Poor Black people speaking candidly about various serious incidents isn’t a hilarious joke.

Most basic stereotyping of black people!#word

(Source: thepeoplesrecord, via soundlessshouts)

❤ After all is said and done…
weheartkanye:

How do I even begin to explain Kanye West? - Rappers version


Hahaha #Ye #TopOfTheFoodChain

weheartkanye:

How do I even begin to explain Kanye West? - Rappers version

Hahaha #Ye #TopOfTheFoodChain

(via kanyedaily)

Why not?
delas - The women’s website from IG
ig.com/br/delas

Advertising Agency: Lew’Lara\TBWA, Brazil
Creative Directors: Jaques Lewkowicz, André Laurentino, Manir Fadel, Luciano Lincoln
Art Director: Bruno Cardoso
Copywriter: David Bessler
Art Buyers: Giuliano Springhetti, Daniela Picchiai
Photography: Ale Catan
Image treatment: Platinum
Graphics: Katia Bontempo, Marcos Pedra
Account Team: Marcio Oliveira, Ricardo Forli, Guilherme Bernardes, Pedro Mesquita
Media Team: Luiz Ritton, Fabio Walker, Débora Veloso
Planiners: Daniel de Tomazo, Tatiana Tsukamoto

This is pretty dope!!!!!
All white street style
Chanel!
F U double C K sweatshirt #thefancy

Beautiful!

by Galla Abdel Fattah.

gwagaphotography:

#13 The “chill-out” syndrome

#madness

gwagaphotography:

#13 The “chill-out” syndrome

#madness

That poetic justice track tho!!!🔥